Pete’s
Montgomery Canal  
Photo-site

Llanymynech to Carreghofa (Section 7)
Part of this section has been restored and is now in use.
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1)
  Leaving the railway embankment and walking towards Llanymynech the canal is in water.
  As seen in this photo, a new winding point has been constructed.
  The pipe seen in the foot crossing is to run excess water off into the “dry” bed above this section .
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2)
  Looking across the canal in the direction of Llanymynech Hill.
Evidence of the area's industrial past is to be seen in the form of the works chimney  on the Warren Continuous  Lime Kiln.
(Now part of the Llanymynech Heritage Area.).
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3)
  Now restored. This section  supports navigation.
  This is confirmed by  the  Narrowboat “George Watson Buck” seen here approaching  Llanymynech .
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4)
  The entrance to one of the arms now comes into view.
   An edge-rail tramway used to run alongside here bringing lime from Llanymynech quarry.
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5)
  The entrance to the arm is now easily seen as overgrown trees shrubs and brambles have been trimmed back.
  The towpath has been resurfaced here and is good for walking.
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6)
  As you near the British Waterways maintenance yard, the wharf walls have been rebuilt but work on the arm is still on-going.
   This arm was also originally  fed by a tramway from the nearby  quarry.
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7)
  The wharf  and restored stable block now provide a base for N.B. George Watson Buck and the new Visitor Centre.
   There is a car park adjacent to
the yard for access to this and the Heritage Area.
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8)
  Bridge No. 92 is the newly rebuilt road bridge that carries the A483 trunk road over the canal.
   Picnic tables are sited on the adjacent  area.
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9)
  On the south side of  Llanymynech road bridge we come to a winding point. This has now been dredged and is ready for use by boats.
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10)
  The canal becomes wider as it leaves the area of the main road and heads in the direction of  Carreghofa.
  The towpath at this side of the bridge also has a new surface.
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11)
  The next blockage, just before Walls Bridge.
  The road which originally passed over the bridge now passes over a flatted bridge that completely  blocks the canal.
  The towpath is in good condition and provides a pleasant walk but the canal is full of reeds.
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12)
   Looking back from the top of  Walls Bridge.
    A better view of  the road that  originally passed over the bridge but now completely  blocks the canal.
  New stiles have been provided for tow-path walkers.
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13)
   This view  is of  Walls Bridge (Bridge No. 93) as seen from the the southern side.
   Please avoid this area when swans are nesting as they can be aggressive.
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14)
   A milepost tells us that we are now 11 miles from Welsh Frankton and 24 miles from Newtown.
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15)
  On the Llanymynech side of the Wern Aqueduct we find a short spur of canal that is now a nature reserve.
    As you can see, entrance is partly hidden by herbage and a large tree.
 This spur was constructed as part of a temporary loop to bypass the site of the aqueduct during its construction.
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16)
  The Wern Aqueduct , built to carry the canal  over  the bed of a now disused railway.
   The line used to run from Blodwell and Nantmawr with a later link for the Llanfyllin branch.
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17)
   Past the aqueduct, looking across the canal towards Llanymynech Hill.

   On the left, we find another spur off the main canal.
This was the continuation of the spur from the Llanymynech side of the aqueduct.
   The main line of the canal passes to the right of this.
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18)
   Just through the bridge hole at Carreghofa , a large fallen tree still completely  blocks the canal .
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19)
View south from the top of the bridge at Carreghofa.
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