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Montgomery Canal  
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 Four Crosses to  Burgedin (Arddleen) (Section 9)

After leaving the Four Crosses area the canal travels through open countryside before reaching its next obstruction at Maerdy Bridge.
The section is navigable south from the winding point by the A483 at Arddleen as far as Berriew but is not yet connected to the national network.
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1)
  The site of the dropped Maerdy Bridge (Bridge 102 ).
  At Penthryn-fawr, just past the canal cottage, the canal is once more blocked by a dropped bridge that carries the A483 trunk road.
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2)
  Looking across the A483 Manchester to Swansea trunk road  towards the dropped Maerdy Bridge.
The canal is piped at an angle across the carriageway and re-appears to pass behind the canal cottage seen to the right of the photo .
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3)
  At Arddleen, the canal is once more crossed by the A483 trunk road.
At this point the towpath passes under the bridge 8 foot below the level of the water. (When the Arddleen bypass was built it was intended to drop the level of the canal between Burgedin and Maerdy by removing the top lock from Burgedin and building a new lock north of the dropped bridge at Maerdy.)

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4)
  Seen from the new A483 road bridge at Arddleen.
  The original road bridge crossed over the canal from the embankment that you can see on the far side of the winding point.
 Evidence of the original bridge can still to be found.
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5)
  At the western end of Arddleen is to be found a new wharf with picnic area that has seating.
  You can spend a pleasant summer afternoon here with stunning views across the canal towards Criggion and Rodneys Pillar.
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6)
  Past the picnic area at Arddleen the canal becomes very wide, wide enough to wind a boat if so required.
  The swan in the photo was quite friendly. Probably due to feeding by nearby houses.
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7)
  As you near Burgedin, you come to Dragon Bridge No. 104.
   The road over this bridge takes you to the Wern where there is a nature reserve, car park and also access to an off-side launching site (please contact British Waterways if you wish to use it).
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8)
  This is the southern side of Dragon Bridge No. 104.
  A small wharf probably existed at this point.
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9)
  At the top of Burgedin Locks, you find the canal branching to the right. This was the entrance to the Guilsfield Arm (now designated as a  nature reserve).
  A wooden sculpture is to be seen to the right of the Montgomery Canal Paddle Gear by the top gate.
If you wish to visit the Guilsfield Arm click on this link.
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10)
  Top Lock at Burgedin.
 Seen looking north from the top of Bridge No.105.
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11)
  Attached to the parapet of Bridge 105 is a plaque to commemorate the re-opening of Burgedin Locks.
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12)
  Looking back towards Bridge 105.
 The building to the left of the photo was the original Lock House that has been extended and is now utilised by British Waterways as its main office for Wales.
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13)
  This sluice seen from the top of the Bottom Lock at Burgedin is the run -off from the Guilsfield Arm that passes above the lock.
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14)
  Top Gate of Burgedin Bottom Lock.
 The paddle gear sited to the right of the top gate was forged at Coalbrookdale in the Ironbridge Gorge.
 Also by the top gate, just to the right of the paddle gear is a Montgomery Canal Milepost.
      “Newtown 19 miles”.
   “Welsh Frankton 16 miles”.

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15)
  Bottom Gates of Burgedin Bottom Lock.
 The open gates are inviting us to continue downwards to the bottom level of the canal and head across the countryside in the direction of Welshpool.
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16)
  Leaving Burgedin Locks.
 This is the view looking back from the direction of Welshpool towards the Bottom Lock. The lock house stands prominently above the locks
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